Raising a Glass to Raising the Cap

Consider this post a virtual toast to the NIH for agreeing to cover more of your salary! In case you missed it last week, the NIH salary cap has been raised from $181,500 to $183,300.  This means that all proposals going out after January 11, 2015 should use the $183,300 cap, and all internal cost sharing should be calculated using this number as well.  Remember, NIH competing grant awards with salary levels below the new cap(s) that are issued on or after the January 11, 2015 effective date, are allowed to reflect adjustments to the current and all future years; that is, you may rebudget to accommodate the current Executive Level II salary level and contractors may charge at the higher level. Keep in mind, however, that your award amount will not increase and total estimated cost of the contract will not be modified.  For more information on applicability of the salary cap, see NOT-OD-15-049.

 

As always, if your investigator is over the salary cap, his or her department must absorb the difference.  Cost sharing must be requested and documented before the application is submitted, and the cost share form can be found here.  Here’s a calculation refresher for a PI with 10% effort and a $200,000 base salary:

[Non-Allowable Salary in a Year] = ( [Investigator Institutional Base] x [Investigator Project Effort] ) – ( [NIH Salary Cap] x [Investigator Project Effort] )

[Non-Allowable Salary in a Year] = ($200,000 x 10%) – ($183,300 x 10%)

= $1,670

And of course, don’t forget the fringes:

[Salary Cost Shared] x [Applicable Fringe Rate] = [Fringes Cost Shared]

[$1,670] x [26.6%]

= $444.22

 

For further details on the magic of cost sharing, take a look at our previous post entitled “Pop a Cap in Your Salary“; you may also find this over-the-cap calculator helpful.  If you need help with your calculations or figuring out which rates apply, drop us a line.  Cheers!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s