Barking Up The Right Tree

We see a lot of NIH projects coming through on parent announcements for investigator-initiated applications (PA-13-302, –303 and –304 are by far the most popular).  These are great catch-all funding opportunities, but did you know that you can search for standing announcements that fit more specifically with your area of research?  When using announcements that are more tailored to your area of expertise, you are more likely to get better study sections, and that understand your work.  While a study on body mass/asthma linkage is certainly submissible under 13-302, a quick search of the Funding Opportunities and Notices database reveals that a standing R01 opportunity exists for Obesity and Asthma.

 

Take a look around and see if any open opportunities fit your work. Remember, if your application is AIDS-related, your next due date is Tuesday, September 8 thanks to Labor Day!

The Many Faces of ASSIST

Like Jack’s beanstalk, ASSIST continues to grow and change as it becomes more firmly rooted in our administrative lives and takes us to heights we never thought possible (OK, maybe not *that* high).  Here are a few changes we’ve confirmed in the ASSIST system since we began using it in January:

 

  1. Adding users to simultaneously work on the application.  Before, the initiator of the application could add users and control what rights they had to the application (view-only, edit, etc).  This is no longer the case.  Now, only users with signatory authority in eRAcommons can add and control user access.  This means that you are likely going to have to ask your GCO to change your settings to “Access Maintainer” if you are going to need to add users to your application at any time.  FWIW: you don’t need to add your GCO.  They automatically have access on the back end; just let him/her know the application is there.
  2. Changing the submission status.   Before, you had to change each individual component of the application to “Ready to Submit” before your GCO could push the button.  Now, you only have to change to “Ready for Submission” one time.  This saves a lot of time and frustration, especially since “Work in Progress” and “Ready for Submission” are now your only options, other than to abandon.
  3. Validation and submission functions. If you try to run validation on your application and nothing happens, or you try to submit to your GCO and you receive an “unable to complete action at this time” message, likely you have a PDF that is non-compliant.  Unfortunately, ASSIST will not tell you which one it is.  If either of these happen to you, go through your application and view each file you’ve uploaded.  When you come across one that ASSIST tells you it is unable to access, that is your problem child and the one you will likely need to replace.

 

ASSIST continues to be a helpful form of submission with value that lies in the ability to have NIH check for compliance BEFORE you submit.  As we continue run across these little nuances, we’ll share them with you, so please share the ones you find with us as well!  If you haven’t have a chance to look over ASSIST yet, take a look at some of our previous posts and/or familiarize yourself with the user guide.  We think you’ll like it once you get to know it 🙂

Sharing is Caring…

… about the future of your research.

 

Still adrift on the ocean of public access?  Dr. Akers in the Shiffman Library recently put together a clarifying resource!  Check it out on their site, and take a look at her data sharing policies for researchers too (hint: this is especially important if your research involves any genomic data!).  Remember: access to your data is a very important part of your funding obligations, so make sure you understand your responsibilities.  Questions? We’re here to help, and so is Dr. Akers!