What’s the JIT of Other Support?

Who has the responsibility for verifying and ensuring “other support disclosures” in applications to the sponsor is accurate?  If you answered-the institution applying for and receiving the funds, you are correct. 

“Other support” is not to be confused with the “research support” section within the bio-sketch.  Refer to this link https://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms/othersupport.htm for guidance as to what info the PI is required to provide in an Other Support as well as samples.  Administrators should work in tandem with the PI to ensure all of the active and pending funding sources are accurately referenced as Sponsors use the “Other Support” to make sure there is no budgetary, scientific or commitment overlap.  Note there can be serious ramifications for inaccurately reporting other support information, especially when the sponsor is federal, since it involves the use of U.S. taxpayer funds.   The severity and length of time for noncompliance determines the type of sanctions received, such as termination of the award.  The link for the NIH Extramural Nexus has been included for further reading on the subject (https://nexus.od.nih.gov/all/2019/07/11/clarifying-long-standing-nih-policies-on-disclosing-other-support/)

Cleared Export Control… Leaving on a Jet Plane

Your principal investigator has answered yes on the export control compliance section in Cayuse.  Did you remember to add Export Control to the Approving Units page?  This is an important section that will protect the university and the researcher from severe criminal and or civil penalties, because of unintentional noncompliance to federal regulations.  Export Control is not a topic that is widely discussed or thought about when a principal investigator begins writing a proposal and the administrator starts assembling the application package.

The word “export” will cause many to believe you’re talking about sending items outside the United States, but this is not the case and it may also include consulting, training, and speaking at conferences.  The code of federal regulations under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) defines export as, “an actual shipment or transmission of items out of the United States”, which also includes releasing or transferring.  Most don’t consider that something can be exported via auditory, visual, verbal or electronic means.  This is the reason that our Export Control office exists in order to prevent the innocent violation of any federal regulations.  If you want to learn more about export compliance click on the link https://research.wayne.edu/integrity/export-control and take note there is an CITI Export Control Module offered by WSU.

Show Me Where It Says That

“We’ve always done it that way.”

“That’s just the way we do it.”

“I don’t know what they want to see.”

“I don’t know who to ask.”

 

In an effort to have a jumping-off point for policy compliance, we at RAS have compiled a digital, (hopefully) handy School of Medicine Policy Handbook.  Some policies originate in the SoM, some are University-wide, all affect award submission and management.  The Policy Handbook is not exhaustive (we’ll keep adding and updating), but it’s a great place to start when crafting your award strategies (and figuring why, in fact, “that’s just the way we do it”).  Let us know if you have questions!

The Many Faces of ASSIST

Like Jack’s beanstalk, ASSIST continues to grow and change as it becomes more firmly rooted in our administrative lives and takes us to heights we never thought possible (OK, maybe not *that* high).  Here are a few changes we’ve confirmed in the ASSIST system since we began using it in January:

 

  1. Adding users to simultaneously work on the application.  Before, the initiator of the application could add users and control what rights they had to the application (view-only, edit, etc).  This is no longer the case.  Now, only users with signatory authority in eRAcommons can add and control user access.  This means that you are likely going to have to ask your GCO to change your settings to “Access Maintainer” if you are going to need to add users to your application at any time.  FWIW: you don’t need to add your GCO.  They automatically have access on the back end; just let him/her know the application is there.
  2. Changing the submission status.   Before, you had to change each individual component of the application to “Ready to Submit” before your GCO could push the button.  Now, you only have to change to “Ready for Submission” one time.  This saves a lot of time and frustration, especially since “Work in Progress” and “Ready for Submission” are now your only options, other than to abandon.
  3. Validation and submission functions. If you try to run validation on your application and nothing happens, or you try to submit to your GCO and you receive an “unable to complete action at this time” message, likely you have a PDF that is non-compliant.  Unfortunately, ASSIST will not tell you which one it is.  If either of these happen to you, go through your application and view each file you’ve uploaded.  When you come across one that ASSIST tells you it is unable to access, that is your problem child and the one you will likely need to replace.

 

ASSIST continues to be a helpful form of submission with value that lies in the ability to have NIH check for compliance BEFORE you submit.  As we continue run across these little nuances, we’ll share them with you, so please share the ones you find with us as well!  If you haven’t have a chance to look over ASSIST yet, take a look at some of our previous posts and/or familiarize yourself with the user guide.  We think you’ll like it once you get to know it 🙂

Built by Association

Managing your citations through MyNCBI can save you a lot of time and searching if you’re using it to build your bibliography.  You can easily associate publications in your constructed bibliography with your funded research, making progress reports and access compliance that much simpler.

 

To add a publication to your bibliography via PubMed, be sure you are signed in to MyNCBI before you begin your search.  Once you are signed in to MyNCBI and in the PubMed environment, run a search to find your article (“Author Search” is one of the quickest ways to find what you are looking for). Select the citations you want to add to My Bibliography and then click the “Send to” link to expand the drop-down menu. Select the destination “My Bibliography” (a message indicates the number of citations selected to be copied to your bibliography) and click “Add to My Bibliography:”

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You will have the option to save these to your “My Bibliography” or “Other Citations” list (or another list you have created).  Most choose to save their own publications to “My Bibliography.”  You’ll see them in your “My Bibliography” when you return to your MyNCBI home page.

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If your added citation is not already associated with your award, you can do it manually.  To do so, be sure your “Display” settings are set to view by “Award:”

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Choose the publication that needs assignment and the award to which it needs to be assigned; click “Assign Awards”:

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You’ll be given the option to choose from more awards. Keep yours checked or choose more and click “Save:”

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And you’re done!  If you have any questions on how to build yourself a usable bibliography through MyNCBI, feel free to reach out to RAS.  Having accurate bibliographies will help you if you’re using SciENcv, too!