An Investigator By Any Other Name

Start your year off right: make sure you’re getting credit for all of your funding!  As new internal funding data is being pulled, it is becoming clear that there are a lot of people that appear with less support than they should for one key reason: they are using the “Co-PI” designation on NIH applications.

 

Here’s a gentle reminder: the “Co-PI” designation is not recognized by NIH.  When applying for NIH funding, don’t select it if you are using the SF424 (also: why are you still using the SF424?) and don’t type it in if you are using ASSIST.  That designation appears for other agencies that DO use Co-PIs; NIH is not the only agency that uses the SF424 and so the SF424 is inclusive of other labels.  For a little more information on how this affects internal candidacy tracks and overall university rankings, check out our previous post, “When Good Labels Go Bad.”

 

Instead, when applying for NIH funding, use the “PD/PI” designation for BOTH if you and another PI are both considered to be PD/PI (or if there are more than two of you, even).  If someone is not sharing principal or directorial duties with you, that person should be designated as “Co-Investigator.”  If you’re still not sure what your label should be, drop us a note and we’ll help you figure it out!  Don’t short yourself (or your department) on support; you work hard and deserve your due credit!

Credit Where Credit Is Due

This is just a quick reminder to ensure that you are identifying the “Division” on your SF424 proposal packages as “Schools of Medicine”.  This is the identifier category used when crediting the School of Medicine with award dollars, and any other unrecognized term will result in uncredited monies (thus dropping our rankings). “Schools of Medicine” is the recognized NIH “acceptable major component code.”

 

Stay tuned for more information in coming weeks about officially recognized department names!

 

 

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