Built by Association

Managing your citations through MyNCBI can save you a lot of time and searching if you’re using it to build your bibliography.  You can easily associate publications in your constructed bibliography with your funded research, making progress reports and access compliance that much simpler.

 

To add a publication to your bibliography via PubMed, be sure you are signed in to MyNCBI before you begin your search.  Once you are signed in to MyNCBI and in the PubMed environment, run a search to find your article (“Author Search” is one of the quickest ways to find what you are looking for). Select the citations you want to add to My Bibliography and then click the “Send to” link to expand the drop-down menu. Select the destination “My Bibliography” (a message indicates the number of citations selected to be copied to your bibliography) and click “Add to My Bibliography:”

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You will have the option to save these to your “My Bibliography” or “Other Citations” list (or another list you have created).  Most choose to save their own publications to “My Bibliography.”  You’ll see them in your “My Bibliography” when you return to your MyNCBI home page.

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If your added citation is not already associated with your award, you can do it manually.  To do so, be sure your “Display” settings are set to view by “Award:”

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Choose the publication that needs assignment and the award to which it needs to be assigned; click “Assign Awards”:

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You’ll be given the option to choose from more awards. Keep yours checked or choose more and click “Save:”

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And you’re done!  If you have any questions on how to build yourself a usable bibliography through MyNCBI, feel free to reach out to RAS.  Having accurate bibliographies will help you if you’re using SciENcv, too!

SciENcv: The Gift That Keeps on Giving

The new NIH biosketch format will be in effect come May 25, but many PIs and administrators* are choosing to make the switch now to avoid crunch-time headaches.  We’ve mentioned SciENcv before, and don’t panic if new systems set your heart a-flutter: it’s not required.  We do, however, think you should consider the many benefits of using the SciENcv tool:

 

  1. Eliminates the need to repeatedly enter biosketch information.  The first time you enter your information into the system will likely be the most time you will have to have to spend with SciENcv. That said, did you know that you can automatically import your information from your eRACommons profile (or ORCID, if you have one) directly into SciENcv?  It’s true!  And it is editable! This will likely save a lot of time, and may even be faster than cutting and pasting text from your old .doc versions of your biosketch into a new template (see below).
  2. Reduces the administrative burden associated with federal grant submission and reporting requirements. Your biosketch information will always be right where you left it: in the cloud, in your MyNCBI account.  Because SciENcv generates and maintains multiple biosketches from your information (including those for NSF and other federal science agencies), you’ll be able to simply tweak any sections you have saved to align more closely with new applications, click a button, and voila! Your biosketch is generated in proper format, tailored to your specifications.  You can even keep multiple profile versions to correspond with different projects or research interests, and generate different biosketches from each one at a later time.  Additionally, SciENcv allows you to pull your publications directly from your MyNCBI.  Your pubs list is generated for you, and you can decide which ones you want to appear in your list.
  3. Provides access to a researcher-claimed data repository with information on expertise, employment, education, and professional accomplishments. Collaborations, anyone?  You can choose whether or which profiles/biosketches are made public to the research community. You will also be provided a unique link to use to direct people to your profile, for your use.
  4. Allows researchers to describe their scientific contributions in their own language. The new biosketch format includes a description of up to five of your most significant contributions to science; in other words, this is where you get to show off a little.  You don’t have to leave your impact open to reviewer interpretation anymore; tell ’em what you’ve done!  You also get to use publications in this section to support your affirmations of grandeur; just keep each description to half of a page.

 

Interested in the power of SciENcv but not sure where to start?  Read all about it, check out the YouTube tutorial provided by NIH, or sign yourself up for a free account (either through your eRACommons account or at the SciENcv portal page) and test it out.  For a little more one-on-one assistance, Dr. Katherine Akers in the Shiffman Medical Library is happy to come to your department for a presentation or individual assistance.  Already started and hit a snag?  RAS is always happy to help get you moving again!  If you would prefer not to use SciENcv, you can access an editable Word copy of the May25-required biosketch format, provided by the NIH HERE.

 

*Note: PIs can designate administrators, research assistants, etc. to have access to their biosketches (and publications) through SciENcv, if said PI does not normally assume responsibility for currency his/herself.